Daily del.icio.us for May 27th through June 2nd

  • Amazon Web Services Blog: Setting up a Load-Balanced Oracle Weblogic Cluster in Amazon EC2 – Oracle recently made available a set of AMI images suitable for use with the Amazon EC2 cloud computing platform. I found the two images (32-bit and 64-bit) that contain Weblogic (along with Oracle Enterprise Linux 5 and JRockit) the most interesting of the lot. This article will explain how to set up a basic two-node Weblogic cluster using the 32-bit Weblogic image provided by Oracle with an Amazon Elastic Load Balancer (ELB)
  • The Atlassian Blog – Introducing Confluence 3.0 – Meet the Macro Browser – Confluence 3.0 introduces the Macro Browser, a new way for users of all experience levels to build content-rich pages in seconds. The macro browser exposes the macros in your Confluence site – charts, task lists, photo galleries, RSS feeds and more – through a point-and-click graphical interface.
  • Google Soups Up Enterprise Search Appliance – Google's plan is to make GSA the most powerful, all-encompassing enterprise search server in the world and the first choice over Microsoft and products from Vivisimo, Endeca and Autonomy.
  • Collaboration and Content Strategies Blog: When You’re a Productivity Suite, Everything’s a Nail – Ultimately, this is just one facet of the "which tool to use?" problem I outlined previously, and it extends to most tools in the information worker toolbelt, from using e-mail for collaboration instead of a collaborative workspace to collating changes in Word docs instead of using a wiki
  • mockito – simpler & better mocking – Mockito is a mocking framework that tastes really well. It lets you write beautiful tests with clean & simple API. Mockito doesn't give you hangover because the tests are very readable and they produce clean verification errors
  • IntelliJ’s Maia shapes up against Eclipse • The Register – Maia will support version three of the Spring open-source Java programming framework, which will be detailed at next week's JavaOne in San Francisco, California, along with support for the OSGi modular Java framework and Apache's Tapestry component-based framework.
  • OpenXava – AJAX applications from JPA entities – OpenXava is a productive way for creating AJAX Enterprise Applications with Java. Indeed, it's faster developing with OpenXava than with Ruby On Rails, Spring MVC, or any other MVC framework.
  • Distributor – Distributor is a software TCP load balancer. Like other load balancers, it accepts connections and distributes them to an array of back end servers. Distributor is compatible with any standard TCP protocol (HTTP, LDAP, IMAP, etc.) and is also IPv6 compatible. Distributor has many unique and advanced features and a high-performance architecture
  • Server Fault – Server Fault is a collaboratively edited question and answer site for system administrators and IT professionals – regardless of platform. It's 100% free, no registration required.
  • Gawker – ‘Page’s Law’ Is Google Founder’s Next-Best Shot at Immortality – Larry Page – Page's Law is the inverse: It says software gets twice as slow every 18 months. This helps explain why your computer seems to get slower as it ages, even though the hardware inside remains unchanged.
  • Google Declares ‘The Web Has Won’ – InternetNews.com – "The Web has won — it's the dominant programming model of our time," said Vic Gondotra, Google's vice president for engineering.

Daily del.icio.us for March 7th through March 11th

  • Coding Horror: Why Can’t Error Messages Be Fun? – Chrome is a joy to use, and in my opinion at least, it's the first true advance in web browser technology since the heady days of Internet Explorer 4.0. Chrome is filled with so many thoughtful details, so many reimaginings of web browser functionality as a true application platform, it's hard to even list them all.
  • Write your own Twitter application – JavaWorld – In this article you'll learn how to build your own Twitter service: an application that accesses tweets via the Twitter API and archives them in the form of a PDF file
  • Ooma rebounds after cutting price for service – After it stumbled out of the gate in July 2007, it's hard to imagine that Palo Alto's Ooma would look forward to an economic downturn. But the startup, which offers free home phone service with the purchase of an Ooma box, has found a new lease on life after cutting its price and expanding its distribution
  • JumpBox | Instant Infrastructure | JumpBox Inc. – We simplify server software deployment with pre-built, pre-configured software applications packaged for deployment on virtual computing platforms.
  • Top 50 New Software Development Books | Agile Zone – In this post I proudly present the Top 50 New Software Development Books, where new means "less than two years old". This list was created using a weighed mix of the following criteria:
  • X2O Blog // We Are Mammoth, Inc. – X2O is a web-based data modeling platform for Adobe® Flex® and Flash® apps.
  • MIT’s Introduction to Algorithms, Lectures 20 and 21: Parallel Algorithms – good coders code, great reuse – This is the thirteenth post in an article series about MIT’s lecture course “Introduction to Algorithms.” In this post I will review lectures twenty and twenty-one on parallel algorithms. These lectures cover the basics of multithreaded programming and multithreaded algorithms.
  • Why HTML – The short and sweet reason is simply this: XHTML offers no compelling advantage — to me — over HTML, but even if it did it would also offer increased complexity and uncertainty that make it unappealing to me.
  • Rough Type: Nicholas Carr’s Blog: The coming of the megacomputer – In a talk yesterday, reports the Financial Times' Richard Waters, the head of Microsoft Research, Rick Rashid, said that about 20 percent of all the server computers being sold in the world "are now being bought by a small handful of internet companies," including Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and Amazon
  • Coding Horror: HTML Validation: Does It Matter? – That said, validation does have its charms. There were a few things that the validation process exposed in our HTML markup that were clearly wrong — an orphaned tag here, and a few inconsistencies in the way we applied tags there. Mark Pilgrim makes the case for validation:

Daily del.icio.us for November 6th through November 9th