Daily del.icio.us for February 7th through February 11th

Daily del.icio.us for July 2nd through July 6th

Daily del.icio.us for February 23rd through February 27th

Daily del.icio.us for May 27th through June 2nd

  • Amazon Web Services Blog: Setting up a Load-Balanced Oracle Weblogic Cluster in Amazon EC2 – Oracle recently made available a set of AMI images suitable for use with the Amazon EC2 cloud computing platform. I found the two images (32-bit and 64-bit) that contain Weblogic (along with Oracle Enterprise Linux 5 and JRockit) the most interesting of the lot. This article will explain how to set up a basic two-node Weblogic cluster using the 32-bit Weblogic image provided by Oracle with an Amazon Elastic Load Balancer (ELB)
  • The Atlassian Blog – Introducing Confluence 3.0 – Meet the Macro Browser – Confluence 3.0 introduces the Macro Browser, a new way for users of all experience levels to build content-rich pages in seconds. The macro browser exposes the macros in your Confluence site – charts, task lists, photo galleries, RSS feeds and more – through a point-and-click graphical interface.
  • Google Soups Up Enterprise Search Appliance – Google's plan is to make GSA the most powerful, all-encompassing enterprise search server in the world and the first choice over Microsoft and products from Vivisimo, Endeca and Autonomy.
  • Collaboration and Content Strategies Blog: When You’re a Productivity Suite, Everything’s a Nail – Ultimately, this is just one facet of the "which tool to use?" problem I outlined previously, and it extends to most tools in the information worker toolbelt, from using e-mail for collaboration instead of a collaborative workspace to collating changes in Word docs instead of using a wiki
  • mockito – simpler & better mocking – Mockito is a mocking framework that tastes really well. It lets you write beautiful tests with clean & simple API. Mockito doesn't give you hangover because the tests are very readable and they produce clean verification errors
  • IntelliJ’s Maia shapes up against Eclipse • The Register – Maia will support version three of the Spring open-source Java programming framework, which will be detailed at next week's JavaOne in San Francisco, California, along with support for the OSGi modular Java framework and Apache's Tapestry component-based framework.
  • OpenXava – AJAX applications from JPA entities – OpenXava is a productive way for creating AJAX Enterprise Applications with Java. Indeed, it's faster developing with OpenXava than with Ruby On Rails, Spring MVC, or any other MVC framework.
  • Distributor – Distributor is a software TCP load balancer. Like other load balancers, it accepts connections and distributes them to an array of back end servers. Distributor is compatible with any standard TCP protocol (HTTP, LDAP, IMAP, etc.) and is also IPv6 compatible. Distributor has many unique and advanced features and a high-performance architecture
  • Server Fault – Server Fault is a collaboratively edited question and answer site for system administrators and IT professionals – regardless of platform. It's 100% free, no registration required.
  • Gawker – ‘Page’s Law’ Is Google Founder’s Next-Best Shot at Immortality – Larry Page – Page's Law is the inverse: It says software gets twice as slow every 18 months. This helps explain why your computer seems to get slower as it ages, even though the hardware inside remains unchanged.
  • Google Declares ‘The Web Has Won’ – InternetNews.com – "The Web has won — it's the dominant programming model of our time," said Vic Gondotra, Google's vice president for engineering.

Daily del.icio.us for May 24th through May 27th

Daily del.icio.us for April 19th through April 21st

  • Sun’s Jonathan Schwartz Tries to Reassure His Troops in Email – Digits – WSJ – Though profit-minded Oracle is widely expected to cut Sun’s headcount sharply after the transaction, Schwartz insists in the message that Oracle realizes that Sun’s people are its greatest asset and will not harm it.
  • Picking Letters, 10 a Day, That Reach Obama – NYTimes.com – He chooses 10 letters, which are slipped into a purple folder and put in the daily briefing book that is delivered to President Obama at the White House residence. Designed to offer a sampling of what Americans are thinking, the letters are read by the president, and he sometimes answers them by hand, in black ink on azure paper.
  • Adobe in Push to Spread Flash Video Format to TVs – NYTimes.com – Now Adobe Systems, which owns the technology and sells the tools to create and distribute it, will announce that Adobe is extending Flash to the television screen. He expects TVs and set-top boxes that support the Flash format to start selling later this year.
  • Williams and Stone: The Twitter Revolution – WSJ.com – But Twitter is much more than a novel way to share updates of one's daily life with friends. It's now evolved into a powerful new marketing and communications tool. Regional emergency preparedness organizations are looking at Twitter as a way to reach millions of people during a disaster. NASA is using it to regularly update interested parties about the status of space shuttle flights. And one journalist solicited help from fellow Twitterers to get himself out of an Egyptian jail.
  • Apache Pivot – Home – The Pivot development team is happy to announce the release of Apache Pivot version 1.1! Pivot is an open-source platform for building rich internet applications in Java. It combines the enhanced productivity and usability features of a modern RIA toolkit with the robustness of the industry-standard Java platform.
  • Atlassian Stimulus Package Announced – For the next 5 days, get Confluence or JIRA for $5 for 5 users. All goes to Room To Read – The Goal: To raise $25k to build 5 libraries for children in the developing world in 5 days… all whilst helping stimulate startups and small teams with kick-ass tools.
  • JSpring presentation: REST, the internet as a database? :: Andrej Koelewijn – I just uploaded the slides of our JSpring presentation to slideshare: “REST, het internet als database“.
  • Oracle Buys Sun – Oracle Corporation and Sun Microsystems announced today they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Oracle will acquire Sun common stock for $9.50 per share in cash
  • The Algebra of Data, and the Calculus of Mutation » Lab49 Blog – With the spreading popularity of languages like F# and Haskell, many people are encountering the concept of an algebraic data type for the first time. When that term is produced without explanation, it almost invariably becomes a source of confusion. In what sense are data types algebraic
  • SOASTA, Inc. – The Cloud Testing Authority – SOASTA has harnessed the immense power of Cloud Computing to become the leading provider of cloud testing, which businesses use to test the real-world performance of their web applications

Daily del.icio.us for April 7th through April 12th

  • How Google Stole Control Over Content Distribution By Stealing Links – Publishing 2.0 – There is so much misunderstanding flying around about the economics of content on the web and the role of Google in the web’s content economy that it’s making my head hurt. So let’s see if we can straighten things out.
  • Performance Anti-Patterns | Haytham El-Fadeel – Remember, the performance work done at the beginning of the project in terms of benchmark, algorithm, and data-structure selection will pay tremendous dividends later on—enough, perhaps, to allow you to avoid that traditional performance fire drill at the end.
  • The Atlassian Blog – Wiki Theater – Five Killer Use Cases for Wikis – Since the conference theme was Doing More with Less, attendees were rather receptive to the idea of getting more out of their wiki. Below is one of the presentations we delivered called Five Killer Use Cases for Wikis. We hope it gives you some ideas on how to get more out of your Confluence wiki.
  • YouTube – Google App Engine – Early Look at Java Language Support – This video introduces the latest features of App Engine, including an early look at Java language support. Andrew Bowers will walk through the development of a sample Java application, from creation to deployment.
  • Google AppEngine uses Jetty! : gregw – Hot on the heels of Google Widget Toolkit(GWT) switching to Jetty, the little server that can has received some more Google luv'n! Google's new App Engine Java service is powered by Jetty! With App Engine, you can build web applications using standard Java technologies and run them on Google's scalable infrastructure.
  • Sorting Algorithm Animations – These pages show 8 different sorting algorithms on 4 different initial conditions. These visualizations are intended to show how each algorithm operates, Show that there is no best sorting algorithm, Show the advantages and disadvantages of each algorithm.
  • App Engine Java Overview – Google App Engine – Google Code – Welcome to Google App Engine for Java! With App Engine, you can build web applications using standard Java technologies and run them on Google's scalable infrastructure. The Java environment provides a Java 6 JVM, a Java Servlets interface, and support for standard interfaces to the App Engine scalable datastore and services, such as JDO, JPA, JavaMail, and JCache
  • New BlazeDS Support Demo | JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA Blog – We’ve created a new IntelliJ IDEA demo: BlazeDS Support. It shows you how to create, run and debug BlazeDS applications with IntelliJ IDEA, and covers a wide variety of features — project configuration, run and deployment configurations, debugger and the others.
  • Google improves Gmail for iPhone, Android | iPhone Atlas – CNET Reviews – Google has released a new Web-based version of Gmail that gives iPhone and Android phone users a more sophisticated version of the online e-mail service, including access to messages that's faster and that works even when offline.
  • Fly the friendly skies in Flight Control (review) | iPhone Atlas – CNET Reviews – At first blush, an air-traffic control simulator sounds about as much as fun as a podiatry theme park. But Flight Control is an absolute gem of a game, a perfect five-minute diversion that's perfectly priced at 99 cents