Links for November 9th through November 16th

  • Developing iOS 7 Apps for iPhone and iPad – Updated for iOS 7. Tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone and iPad platform using the iOS SDK. User interface designs for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-v
  • Android vs. iOS Development: Fight! | TechCrunch – The eternal startup question "Android or iOS first?" grows ever thornier, with news that Android’s market share exceeds 80%. But never mind the managers and non-technical founders: what do developers! developers! think of that divide? Whoever makes life easier for them gains a sizable edge.
  • Java EE 6 vs. Spring Framework: A technology decision making process – Pure Java EE 6 Stack vs. Spring with Java EE – The following blog article summarizes key issues I found interesting when you consider one of those technology stack options. I will not try to convince somebody to choose either of the two. It’s the decision making process and the key arguments that are important to me and that I want to share.
  • Security Concerns Not Slowing Public Cloud Adoption – If CIOs are so scared about public cloud security, why is infrastructure as a service adoption proceeding at breakneck pace?
  • RocksDB | A persistent key-value store for fast storage environments – RocksDB is an embeddable persistent key-value store for fast storage. RocksDB can also be the foundation for a client-server database but our current focus is on embedded workloads. RocksDB builds on LevelDB to be scalable to run on servers with many CPU
  • Surprise! Java is fastest for server-side Web apps – In benchmarks, Java-based frameworks enjoy big performance lead over rivals, but other factors entice developers as well
  • Eclipse 3.6 vs IntelliJ IDEA 10.5: Pros and Cons | Java Code Geeks – After having worked with Eclipse for over 5 years I’ve came to use IntelliJ IDEA intensively on a J2EE project in three months and took this as an opportunity to compare the two. You can’t really compare 5 years and 3 months but I still believe that it is
  • On-Demand Webinar: Using PhoneGap and Couchbase Lite to Create Data-Intensive Applications – In this webinar you'll see how you can use PhoneGap and Couchbase Lite together to create highly responsive, datacentric applications in HTML5 or JavaScript that are always-available regardless of network connectivity.
  • Pivotal Introduces Pivotal One, The World’s First Next-Generation Multi-Cloud Enterprise PaaS – Pivotal Introduces Pivotal One, The World's First Next-Generation Multi-Cloud Enterprise PaaS
  • An Introduction to Nitra | JetBrains Company Blog – Nitra is not only about creating and extending existing languages, but it also about tooling. Defining a syntax module will also provide features such as syntax highlighting, code folding, static analysis, refactoring, navigation and symbol lookup, effectively all the features that we provide in our existing tools and IDE’s.
  • dataset: databases for lazy people – The answer is that programmers are lazy, and thus they tend to prefer the easiest solution they find. And in Python, a database isn’t the simplest solution for storing a bunch of structured data. This is what dataset is going to change!
  • 7 Things That Make Google F1 and the FoundationDB SQL Layer So Strikingly Similar – Below are seven of the strongest similarities; All quotes come directly from the above mentioned Google F1 paper. Read on and make up your own mind.
  • Slides: Mobile is eating the world – Quartz – This is a high-level view of mobile devices and usage worldwide, and the dynamics that shape them. Click to skip ahead to each section: mobile scale, tablets, ecosystem, mobile social & discovery.
  • Why You Should Never Use MongoDB – When you’re picking a data store, the most important thing to understand is where in your data — and where in its connections — the business value lies. If you don’t know yet, which is perfectly reasonable, then choose something that won’t paint you into a
  • Research Publications at Facebook – Giving people the power to share and connect requires constant innovation. At Facebook, we solve technical problems no one else has seen because no one else has built a social network of this size.
    Working at the intersection of research and engineering to make the world more open and connected is one of the best things about being at Facebook right now.
  • In The Age Of Twitter, Do We Need Oracle? Larry Ellison Isn’t Sure – Modern computing depends less and less on established technology vendors like Oracle. Just ask Twitter. Or Larry Ellison.
  • Sample Mobile Application with AngularJS – In recent months, I have been sharing different versions of the Employee Directory sample application built with different technology stacks, different frameworks, and different back-end (REST services) implementations. A number of you have asked for a version of the application built with AngularJS. So here it is

Links for October 21st through October 25th

Links for August 5th through August 9th

  • U.S. Should Adopt Higher Standards for Science Education: Scientific American – Teachers, scientists and policymakers have drafted ambitious new education standards. All 50 states should adopt them
  • Testing SQL Server Code with TST – Enter TST. TST is an Open source Unit Testing framework specifically meant for testing SQL Server Database Code.
  • Fr. Naus retires after 50 years at Marquette – Rev. John Naus, S.J., has retired after serving Marquette for nearly five decades. From his days as Tumbleweed the Clown, his famous Christmas cards and long tradition of celebrating 10 p.m. Mass at St. Joan of Arc Chapel, he has touched many lives.
  • Watch High-Speed Trading Bots Go Berserk – Technology Review – The stock market today is a war zone, where algobots fight each other over pennies, millions of times a second. Sometimes, the casualties are merely companies like Knight, and few people have much sympathy for them. But inevitably, at some point in the future, significant losses will end up being borne by investors with no direct connection to the HFT [high-frequency trading] world, which is so complex that its potential systemic repercussions are literally unknowable.
  • Long live SOA in the cloud era – SOA’s dictum that ‘everything is a service’ is more relevant than ever – A few years back, SOA (service-oriented architecture) was all the rage. Vendors rushed to remarket everything as SOA, and SOA-washing was the new greenwashing. But in today'srush to the cloud, have we abandoned SOA? If so, we're in trouble.
  • A Brave New World of Testing? An Interview with Google’s James Whittaker – To get an answer, I turned to James Whittaker, an engineering director at Google, which has been at the forefront of leveraging the cloud. James is a noted expert and author on software testing, whose team has been managing Google’s cloud computing testing.
  • MongoMapper – A Mongo ORM for Ruby – Built from the ground up to be simple and extendable, MongoMapper is a lovely way to model your applications and persist your data in MongoDB. It has all the bells and whistles you need to get the job done and have fun along the way.
  • Apache Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system – Kafka provides a publish-subscribe solution that can handle all activity stream data and processing on a consumer-scale web site. This kind of activity (page views, searches, and other user actions) are a key ingredient in many of the social feature on the modern web
  • Brian ONeill’s Blog: A Big Data Trifecta: Storm, Kafka and Cassandra – We're big fans of Cassandra. We also use Storm as our distributed processing engine. We've had a lot of success using our Cassandra Bolt to create a successful marriage between the two. To date, we've been using Storm to integrate with our legacy technologies via our JMS Spout. Now we're looking to expand its role beyond legacy system integration.
  • 9 Reasons Why Your Company Needs A Mobile Strategist – Forbes – As their name implies, these mobile strategists play a critical role in gathering business requirements, building a ‘mobile center of excellence,’ creating a mobile strategy that aligns to the key business drivers, and selecting the right technology and platform to support both short- and long-term needs. At this point, a business without a mobile strategy is a business without a strategy at all.
  • Principles of User Interface Design – Principles of User Interface Design

Links for December 29th through January 3rd

Links for May 23rd through May 24th

Daily del.icio.us for February 12th through February 13th

  • InfoQ: Language Parity: Closures and the JVM – In this presentation from the JVM Languages Summit 2008, Neal Gafter discusses closures on the JVM. Topics covered include the JVM libraries, the challenges of running other languages on the JVM, language-specific wrapper/shim libraries, ways of making the JVM more language-friendly, whether lambda expressions are too hard, the history of closures, and forking the JVM to support closures.
  • The Role of Architect vs. The Role of the Software Architect, A Reality Check from Beautiful Architecture – O’Reilly FYI Blog – We recently released Beautiful Architecture, a beautiful new book with a lovely image of a nautilus shell gracing the cover. The collection of essays from more than a dozen of today#039;s leading software designers and architects illuminates the necessary ingredients for robust, elegant, and flexible architecture. Here John Klein, Software Engineering Institute, and David Weiss, Avaya Laboratories, grapple with the multiple definitions of architect.
  • File Folder Unlocker (freeware): Unlock in use files – File amp; Folder Unlocker is a powerful yet easy-to-use system utility that gives you complete control over the locked files and folders on your computer. Like our other free utilities, File amp; Folder Unlocker is free for both commercial and non-commercial use
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3: Screenshots: Insight – Software – ZDNet Australia – RHEL 5.3 includes support for Intel#039;s latest chip architecture, Core i7, codenamed Nehalem. It also includes the Open Java Development Kit, an open-source implementation of Java SE 6 supported by Sun Microsystems. This inclusion is intended to support Red Hat#039;s Java application server, JBoss.
  • 10 Ways Microsoft’s Retail Stores Will Differ From Apple Stores – PC World – Instead of a quot;Genius Barquot; (as Apple provides) Microsoft will offer an Excuse Bar. It will be staffed by Microsofties trained in the art of evading questions, directing you to complicated and obscure fixes, and explaining it#039;s a problem with the hardware — not a software bug
  • Saturday Night Live – Pelosi/Reid Open – Video – NBC.com – SNL Quote of the Day: quot;Maybe if we spent more money on schools amp; condoms, there wouldn#039;t be so many stupid people running around ruining our economy.quot; (via Reddit.com)
  • "Google Devalues Everything It Touches" – Wall Street Journal Chief – Google devalues everything it touches. Google is great for Google but it#039;s terrible for content providers
  • Obama’s BlackBerry brings personal safety risks | Surveillance State – CNET News – When the mainstream media first announced Barack Obama#039;s quot;victoryquot; in keeping his BlackBerry, the focus was on the security of the device, and keeping the U.S. president#039;s e-mail communications private from spies and hackers
  • Introducing Outlook Live for schools – and cool new features for everyone – With Exchange 14, you can access OWA or Outlook Live with Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer. I have to say, I#039;ve been dying to tell you about this, especially after all the comments on our last video! Openness has always been part of Exchange#039;s DNA, which you can see from how we license Exchange ActiveSync to partners and competitors alike, in the variety of mobile phones we support, from the iPhone to Nokia phones to Windows Mobile, in our support for web services, and now in the browsers we support.
  • Is the Relational Database Doomed? – ReadWriteWeb – In this post, we#039;ll look at the current trend of moving away from relational databases in certain situations and what this means for the future of the relational database.