Links for November 9th through November 16th

  • Developing iOS 7 Apps for iPhone and iPad – Updated for iOS 7. Tools and APIs required to build applications for the iPhone and iPad platform using the iOS SDK. User interface designs for mobile devices and unique user interactions using multi-touch technologies. Object-oriented design using model-v
  • Android vs. iOS Development: Fight! | TechCrunch – The eternal startup question "Android or iOS first?" grows ever thornier, with news that Android’s market share exceeds 80%. But never mind the managers and non-technical founders: what do developers! developers! think of that divide? Whoever makes life easier for them gains a sizable edge.
  • Java EE 6 vs. Spring Framework: A technology decision making process – Pure Java EE 6 Stack vs. Spring with Java EE – The following blog article summarizes key issues I found interesting when you consider one of those technology stack options. I will not try to convince somebody to choose either of the two. It’s the decision making process and the key arguments that are important to me and that I want to share.
  • Security Concerns Not Slowing Public Cloud Adoption – If CIOs are so scared about public cloud security, why is infrastructure as a service adoption proceeding at breakneck pace?
  • RocksDB | A persistent key-value store for fast storage environments – RocksDB is an embeddable persistent key-value store for fast storage. RocksDB can also be the foundation for a client-server database but our current focus is on embedded workloads. RocksDB builds on LevelDB to be scalable to run on servers with many CPU
  • Surprise! Java is fastest for server-side Web apps – In benchmarks, Java-based frameworks enjoy big performance lead over rivals, but other factors entice developers as well
  • Eclipse 3.6 vs IntelliJ IDEA 10.5: Pros and Cons | Java Code Geeks – After having worked with Eclipse for over 5 years I’ve came to use IntelliJ IDEA intensively on a J2EE project in three months and took this as an opportunity to compare the two. You can’t really compare 5 years and 3 months but I still believe that it is
  • On-Demand Webinar: Using PhoneGap and Couchbase Lite to Create Data-Intensive Applications – In this webinar you'll see how you can use PhoneGap and Couchbase Lite together to create highly responsive, datacentric applications in HTML5 or JavaScript that are always-available regardless of network connectivity.
  • Pivotal Introduces Pivotal One, The World’s First Next-Generation Multi-Cloud Enterprise PaaS – Pivotal Introduces Pivotal One, The World's First Next-Generation Multi-Cloud Enterprise PaaS
  • An Introduction to Nitra | JetBrains Company Blog – Nitra is not only about creating and extending existing languages, but it also about tooling. Defining a syntax module will also provide features such as syntax highlighting, code folding, static analysis, refactoring, navigation and symbol lookup, effectively all the features that we provide in our existing tools and IDE’s.
  • dataset: databases for lazy people – The answer is that programmers are lazy, and thus they tend to prefer the easiest solution they find. And in Python, a database isn’t the simplest solution for storing a bunch of structured data. This is what dataset is going to change!
  • 7 Things That Make Google F1 and the FoundationDB SQL Layer So Strikingly Similar – Below are seven of the strongest similarities; All quotes come directly from the above mentioned Google F1 paper. Read on and make up your own mind.
  • Slides: Mobile is eating the world – Quartz – This is a high-level view of mobile devices and usage worldwide, and the dynamics that shape them. Click to skip ahead to each section: mobile scale, tablets, ecosystem, mobile social & discovery.
  • Why You Should Never Use MongoDB – When you’re picking a data store, the most important thing to understand is where in your data — and where in its connections — the business value lies. If you don’t know yet, which is perfectly reasonable, then choose something that won’t paint you into a
  • Research Publications at Facebook – Giving people the power to share and connect requires constant innovation. At Facebook, we solve technical problems no one else has seen because no one else has built a social network of this size.
    Working at the intersection of research and engineering to make the world more open and connected is one of the best things about being at Facebook right now.
  • In The Age Of Twitter, Do We Need Oracle? Larry Ellison Isn’t Sure – Modern computing depends less and less on established technology vendors like Oracle. Just ask Twitter. Or Larry Ellison.
  • Sample Mobile Application with AngularJS – In recent months, I have been sharing different versions of the Employee Directory sample application built with different technology stacks, different frameworks, and different back-end (REST services) implementations. A number of you have asked for a version of the application built with AngularJS. So here it is

Links for November 6th through November 9th

Links for June 22nd through July 8th

Links for June 1st through June 12th

  • Guava – simple recipes to make your Java code cleaner – Here are some simple examples to encourage to use Guava Library in your code. The Guava project contains several of Google's core libraries that we rely on in our Java-based projects: collections, caching, primitives support, concurrency libraries, common annotations, string processing, I/O, and so forth.
  • JPA 2.1 Tips, Tricks and Examples – This BOF provides insight into the features being introduced in the next JPA specification. It illustrates, through the use of code examples, why and when not to use the new features.
  • How Three Guys Rebuilt the Foundation of Facebook – “Apple is about polish. Google is about scale. Microsoft is about, well, 30 years old,” says ex-Googler and Box vice president of engineering Sam Schillace. “But Facebook is about innovation. They’re not necessarily optimized for elegance. They’re optimized for innovation. The idea is to crush everyone with pure experimentation and velocity.”
  • The New, The Improved & The Shiny at SenchaCon 2013 – One of the big themes for Sencha is more convergence between Touch and Ext JS, and at SenchaCon you’ll be first to see the future of Ext JS live. Don Griffin and crew be showing off major new features that take the Ext JS grid to a new level of design flexibility and efficiency.
  • Apple Unveils iOS 7 – Completely Redesigned With Stunning User Interface & Great New Features – Apple Unveils iOS 7 – Completely Redesigned With Stunning User Interface & Great New Features
  • For the first time, a third of American adults own tablet computers – A third (34%) of American adults ages 18 and older own a tablet computer like an iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, Google Nexus, or Kindle Fire—almost twice as many as the 18% who owned a tablet a year ago.
  • Spring MVC 3 enable Cross Origin Resource Sharing – Spring MVC 3 enable Cross Origin Resource Sharing
  • Why Twitter’s Bootstrap is Seriously Important – The ultimate success of Twitter’s Bootstrap was the standardization of HTML syntax. This HTML syntax targeted the most commonly used collection of HTML elements (tables, forms, etc) and got everyone to write them the same.
  • Writing less code when using the AWS SDK for Java – AWS Developer Blog – Java – Fortunately, the Google Guava open source library offers some classes that make it possible to build maps in a way that is compatible with the SDK’s fluent interface. In this post, we show how using Google Guava’s collection classes can make it easier to use services like Amazon DynamoDB with the low-level Java SDK
  • Building a Notification App for iOS with Sencha Touch and PhoneGap – Part 1 of 4 | Druck-I.T. – While Sencha Touch 2.x directly supports push notifications through its Ext.device.Push class,  as of this writing, its support is limited to iOS. We therefore opted to use a PhoneGap-based solution, described below, that supports both iOS and Android in o
  • Going native: Why a veteran web developer finally turned to OS-native apps – “Native versus web” is a non-question: Most services need native apps and a web presence. The real question (beyond which comes first) is how do you build those native apps? “HTML5-native” (PhoneGap style) versus “pure native.” If you have a unique service, e.g. a specialised enterprise app, HTML5 could be ideal, a convenient way to build quickly and portably. But if you want your user experience to really excel, native is still king – for now.

Links for May 14th through May 21st

Links for May 7th through May 13th

Links for March 21st through March 23rd

Links for March 16th through March 20th

  • Google Keep—Save what’s on your mind – With Google Keep, you can quickly jot ideas down when you think of them and even include checklists and photos to keep track of what’s important to you. Your notes are safely stored in Google Drive and synced to all your devices so you can always have
  • Sencha.io Support in Sencha Cmd – Sencha Cmd allows you to perform a wide variety of tasks, including managing how an application is configured and hosted in Sencha.io. As the Sencha.io platform grows and more services and configuration options are added to it, we will continue to add equivalent features to Sencha Cmd, so developers can automate their workflows and test effectively.
  • Superhero.js – List of articles, tutorials, videos on how to create, test and manage large JS apps – Creating, testing and maintaining a large JavaScript code base is not easy — especially since great resources on how to do this are hard to find. This page is a collection of the best articles, videos and presentations we've found on the topic.
  • Backbone 1.0 is released – The essential premise at the heart of Backbone has always been to try and discover the minimal set of data-structuring (Models and Collections) and user interface (Views and URLs) primitives that are useful when building web applications with JavaScript
  • What 420,000 insecure devices reveal about Web security – Using a simple technique, a researcher creates a benign botnet to survey the breadth of the Internet, and finds a back door flung wide open and beckoning the bad guys.
  • It’s Lose-Lose vs. Win-Win-Win-Win-Win – NYTimes.com – According to the Center for Climate and Electricity Policy at the nonpartisan Resources for the Future, a tax of $25 per ton of carbon-dioxide emitted would raise approximately $125 billion annually
  • You are watching your DNS logs, right? – Watching the DNS requests being made by your systems allows you to identify network level indicators of compromise.
  • Dave Grohl’s SXSW 2013 Keynote Speech : NPR – Dave Grohl has become the unofficial Mayor of Rock 'n' Roll: a gregarious ambassador who wins armloads of Grammys and even directs a music documentary. Watch Grohl's keynote address at the SXSW Music Festival in Austin, Texas.
  • Splunk as a Big Data Platform for Developers – YouTube – Splunk is a Big Data platform that transforms the massive amount of heterogeneous and often totally unstructured machine data being generated across the enterprise into valuable insights and realtime operational intelligence.
  • Does the World Need Another Hadoop Distro? Greenplum Says Yes | SiliconANGLE – Greenplum is challenging Cloudera and MapR with a new Hadoop solution that delivers faster response times and better integration than the competition. Dubbed Dubbed Pivotal HD
  • EMC Greenplum Tackles Big Data With Hadoop Distribution – CIO.com – EMC Greenplum debuts its own Hadoop distribution, Pivotal HD, which marries Greenplum's massively parallel processing database technology with the Apache Hadoop framework to create a technology called HAWQ.
  • Finally! A Hadoop Hello World That Isn’t A Lame Word Count! – So I got bored of the old WordCount Hello World, and being a fairly mathy person, I decided to make my own Hello World in which I coaxed Hadoop into transposing a matrix!
  • By the numbers: How Google Compute Engine stacks up to Amazon EC2 — Tech News and Analysis – with Google Compute Engine, AWS has a formidable new competitor in the public cloud space, and we’ll likely be moving some of Scalr’s production workloads from our hybrid aws-rackspace-softlayer setup to it when it leaves beta. There’s a strong technical case for migrating heavy workloads to GCE, and I’ll be grabbing popcorn to eagerly watch as the battle unfolds between the giants.

Links for February 11th through February 15th

Links for February 5th through February 10th