Links for February 21st through February 26th

Links for October 29th through November 1st

Links for July 3rd through July 6th

Daily del.icio.us for March 10th through March 13th

Daily del.icio.us for February 7th through February 11th

Daily del.icio.us for June 8th through June 14th

Daily del.icio.us for March 27th through March 30th

Daily del.icio.us for February 6th through February 8th

Daily del.icio.us for April 7th through April 12th

  • How Google Stole Control Over Content Distribution By Stealing Links – Publishing 2.0 – There is so much misunderstanding flying around about the economics of content on the web and the role of Google in the web’s content economy that it’s making my head hurt. So let’s see if we can straighten things out.
  • Performance Anti-Patterns | Haytham El-Fadeel – Remember, the performance work done at the beginning of the project in terms of benchmark, algorithm, and data-structure selection will pay tremendous dividends later on—enough, perhaps, to allow you to avoid that traditional performance fire drill at the end.
  • The Atlassian Blog – Wiki Theater – Five Killer Use Cases for Wikis – Since the conference theme was Doing More with Less, attendees were rather receptive to the idea of getting more out of their wiki. Below is one of the presentations we delivered called Five Killer Use Cases for Wikis. We hope it gives you some ideas on how to get more out of your Confluence wiki.
  • YouTube – Google App Engine – Early Look at Java Language Support – This video introduces the latest features of App Engine, including an early look at Java language support. Andrew Bowers will walk through the development of a sample Java application, from creation to deployment.
  • Google AppEngine uses Jetty! : gregw – Hot on the heels of Google Widget Toolkit(GWT) switching to Jetty, the little server that can has received some more Google luv'n! Google's new App Engine Java service is powered by Jetty! With App Engine, you can build web applications using standard Java technologies and run them on Google's scalable infrastructure.
  • Sorting Algorithm Animations – These pages show 8 different sorting algorithms on 4 different initial conditions. These visualizations are intended to show how each algorithm operates, Show that there is no best sorting algorithm, Show the advantages and disadvantages of each algorithm.
  • App Engine Java Overview – Google App Engine – Google Code – Welcome to Google App Engine for Java! With App Engine, you can build web applications using standard Java technologies and run them on Google's scalable infrastructure. The Java environment provides a Java 6 JVM, a Java Servlets interface, and support for standard interfaces to the App Engine scalable datastore and services, such as JDO, JPA, JavaMail, and JCache
  • New BlazeDS Support Demo | JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA Blog – We’ve created a new IntelliJ IDEA demo: BlazeDS Support. It shows you how to create, run and debug BlazeDS applications with IntelliJ IDEA, and covers a wide variety of features — project configuration, run and deployment configurations, debugger and the others.
  • Google improves Gmail for iPhone, Android | iPhone Atlas – CNET Reviews – Google has released a new Web-based version of Gmail that gives iPhone and Android phone users a more sophisticated version of the online e-mail service, including access to messages that's faster and that works even when offline.
  • Fly the friendly skies in Flight Control (review) | iPhone Atlas – CNET Reviews – At first blush, an air-traffic control simulator sounds about as much as fun as a podiatry theme park. But Flight Control is an absolute gem of a game, a perfect five-minute diversion that's perfectly priced at 99 cents

Daily del.icio.us for March 24th through March 27th

  • JPivot – Home – JPivot is a JSP custom tag library that renders an OLAP table and let users perform typical OLAP navigations like slice and dice, drill down and roll up. It uses Mondrian as its OLAP Server. JPivot also supports XMLA datasource access.
  • olap4j: Open Java API for OLAP – olap4j is designed to be a common API for any OLAP server, so you can write an application on one OLAP server and easily switch it to another. And built on that API, there will be a growing collection of tools and components
  • Mistaeks I Hav Made: Mapping Inheritance Cleanly with XStream – This works with multiple subclasses and with SingleValueConverters. As long as you can determine the concrete type to be unmarshalled from the contents of the marshalled element, you can use this technique to elide the class attribute and get cleaner XML.
  • Amazon Web Services: No Open Cloud Manifesto for us | Between the Lines | ZDNet.com – Amazon will join Microsoft as two big cloud computing players not signing on to the Open Cloud Manifesto.

    The manifesto, which has raised a ruckus following a Microsoft blog post, is set to be released Monday with IBM as the ringleader. Given the hubbub it was only natural to wonder where Amazon Web Services, one of the premier cloud computing players stood

  • MapReduce programming with Apache Hadoop – JavaWorld – Google and its MapReduce framework may rule the roost when it comes to massive-scale data processing, but there's still plenty of that goodness to go around. This article gets you started with Hadoop, the open source MapReduce implementation for processing large data sets
  • RSS to PDF Newspaper – This is a free software project to let people create printable PDFs from content found on the web. It is a free alternative to HP's Tabbloid service. It is being developed as part of the Five Filters project to promote alternative, non-corporate media.
  • Oracle: If RHEL were free, we wouldn’t compete | The Open Road – CNET News – Now we find out that it's not a question of support at all, but rather that Oracle simply wants Linux to be free. Why? Because that makes its overpriced software seem cheaper.

    At least Oracle is being honest now. Coekaerts' argument is cheeky, but it makes strategic sense for Oracle. It just makes no financial sense for Red Hat.

  • Ubuntu promises DIY Amazon cloud • The Register – The Jaunty Jackalope edition of Ubuntu, version 9.04, due in April, will let you take existing Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) from Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) and run them on your own Ubuntu servers.
  • Book Review: Pragmatic Thinking & Learning – Andy Hunt, co-author of several titles in the Pragmatic Programmers series, has turned his pragmatic prism on our brains. His new book, Pragmatic Thinking and Learning: Refactoring Your Wetware, is a delight to read, provided you understand the vocabulary of agile development. It could be a perfect gift for your favorite geek this holiday season.
  • jaxb: A JAXB Tutorial – Wolfgang Laun has created an outstanding tutorial. Wolfgang’s tutorial is possibly the most comprehensive (and most current) information on every aspect of JAXB. I highly recommend it both as a getting started guide and a reference.