Links for March 21st through March 23rd

Links for August 5th through August 9th

  • U.S. Should Adopt Higher Standards for Science Education: Scientific American – Teachers, scientists and policymakers have drafted ambitious new education standards. All 50 states should adopt them
  • Testing SQL Server Code with TST – Enter TST. TST is an Open source Unit Testing framework specifically meant for testing SQL Server Database Code.
  • Fr. Naus retires after 50 years at Marquette – Rev. John Naus, S.J., has retired after serving Marquette for nearly five decades. From his days as Tumbleweed the Clown, his famous Christmas cards and long tradition of celebrating 10 p.m. Mass at St. Joan of Arc Chapel, he has touched many lives.
  • Watch High-Speed Trading Bots Go Berserk – Technology Review – The stock market today is a war zone, where algobots fight each other over pennies, millions of times a second. Sometimes, the casualties are merely companies like Knight, and few people have much sympathy for them. But inevitably, at some point in the future, significant losses will end up being borne by investors with no direct connection to the HFT [high-frequency trading] world, which is so complex that its potential systemic repercussions are literally unknowable.
  • Long live SOA in the cloud era – SOA’s dictum that ‘everything is a service’ is more relevant than ever – A few years back, SOA (service-oriented architecture) was all the rage. Vendors rushed to remarket everything as SOA, and SOA-washing was the new greenwashing. But in today'srush to the cloud, have we abandoned SOA? If so, we're in trouble.
  • A Brave New World of Testing? An Interview with Google’s James Whittaker – To get an answer, I turned to James Whittaker, an engineering director at Google, which has been at the forefront of leveraging the cloud. James is a noted expert and author on software testing, whose team has been managing Google’s cloud computing testing.
  • MongoMapper – A Mongo ORM for Ruby – Built from the ground up to be simple and extendable, MongoMapper is a lovely way to model your applications and persist your data in MongoDB. It has all the bells and whistles you need to get the job done and have fun along the way.
  • Apache Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system – Kafka provides a publish-subscribe solution that can handle all activity stream data and processing on a consumer-scale web site. This kind of activity (page views, searches, and other user actions) are a key ingredient in many of the social feature on the modern web
  • Brian ONeill’s Blog: A Big Data Trifecta: Storm, Kafka and Cassandra – We're big fans of Cassandra. We also use Storm as our distributed processing engine. We've had a lot of success using our Cassandra Bolt to create a successful marriage between the two. To date, we've been using Storm to integrate with our legacy technologies via our JMS Spout. Now we're looking to expand its role beyond legacy system integration.
  • 9 Reasons Why Your Company Needs A Mobile Strategist – Forbes – As their name implies, these mobile strategists play a critical role in gathering business requirements, building a ‘mobile center of excellence,’ creating a mobile strategy that aligns to the key business drivers, and selecting the right technology and platform to support both short- and long-term needs. At this point, a business without a mobile strategy is a business without a strategy at all.
  • Principles of User Interface Design – Principles of User Interface Design

Daily del.icio.us for June 17th through June 22nd

Daily del.icio.us for May 24th through May 27th

Daily del.icio.us for May 2nd through May 7th

  • Agile Architecture : Software & Technology @kirkk.com – Agile practices play a critical role in agile architecture. Test-driven development lends you the courage to undergo architectural evolution. Continuous integration accommodates architectural shifts by ensuring issues encountered while refactoring are identified and corrected quickly. Supplementing your up-front design approach with an emergent strategy emphasizing spikes or proofs helps verify the architectural vision.
  • Googleplex in 200 Seconds – Quick tour of Googleplex, Google's Mountain View headquarters
  • Fresh Update: IntelliJ IDEA 8.1.1 | JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA Blog – We’ve just released the fresh IntelliJ IDEA update version 8.1.1 You’re welcome to see what has been fixed and grab the fresh update off the shelf.
  • Ext JS – Ext JS 3.0 RC1.1 Released – There are many enhancements in Ext JS 3.0, too many to include in a single post. Some of the major features in Ext JS 3.0 are the splitting of Ext Core and Ext JS, Charting for visualizations, additional User Interface improvements, CRUD-like support with Ext.data.DataWriter, Remoting using Ext.Direct, CSS enhancements to make theming easier, and Accessibility improvements – Section 508 and ARIA support. We also fixed several browser issues for the latest Chrome and Safari releases and added IE8 support.
  • If You Tweet It, They Will Come – Pogue’s Posts Blog – NYTimes.com – First, something about Twitter creates trust and togetherness; some of my actors drove over an hour to a place they’d never been, responding to a 140-character request from a person they’d never met. No other technology, online or off, would have resolved my quest so satisfactorily.
  • Ubuntu on Amazon Web Services | Ubuntu – Ubuntu Server Edition on Amazon gives you the power of Ubuntu combined with the flexibility of Amazon's cloud computing service. Ubuntu's modularity, virtualization capabilities, range of applications and optimised performance make it the perfect solution if you're deploying applications on Amazon's Elastic Computing (EC2) cloud.
  • A new JDBC Driver for SQL Server – Microsoft SQL Server today announced the general availability of the JDBC v2.0 driver has been released. This release continues Microsoft's commitment to the Java community and non-Microsoft centric programming platforms. The driver can be found at http://msdn.microsoft.com/data/jdbc.
  • Anthropology: The Art of Building a Successful Social Site – ReadWriteWeb – Picture if you will, a collaborative site that runs on two servers, is managed by four people, and has attracted a third of its target demographic within six months of launch
  • Wade scores 41 as Heat slam Hawks to set up Game Seven | Sports | Reuters – Dwyane Wade scored 41 points to lead the Miami Heat to a 98-72 victory over the Atlanta Hawks on Friday and force a deciding Game Seven in their Eastern Conference playoff series
  • Google Code Blog: Gmail for mobile HTML5 Series: Using AppCache to Launch Offline – Part 1 – On April 7th, Google launched a new version of Gmail for mobile for iPhone and Android-powered devices built on HTML5. We shared the behind-the-scenes story through this blog and would like to share more of our learnings in a brief series of follow up blog posts.

Daily del.icio.us for Aug 27, 2007 through Sep 01, 2007

  • Programming Resources, News and Ideas: Red Hat Developer Studio – Introduction – The beta version of Red hat Developer Studio has been released recently. RHDS is a based on eclipse with set of pre-configured tools from JBoss IDE and Exadel Studio. RHDS gives us out of box and 100% open source platform for enterprise-level….
  • Ajaxian Featured Tutorial: Building a Flex DataGrid – This week, we?ve got a nice one for all of you Adobe Flex aficionados. The boys over at Paranoid Ferret Productions have a good introduction on how to build one of the most useful of components, a DataGrid, Flex-style.
  • Eulerian Technologies – DatePicker using Prototype and Scriptaculous – DatePicker using Prototype and Scriptaculous. You’ll find here the code and instructions for a datepicker widget using Prototype and Scriptaculous librairies.
  • Apache News Online: 24 August 2007 – Apache FOP 0.94 Released – The Apache XML Graphics team is pleased to announce the release of Apache FOP version 0.94. FOP (Formatting Objects Processor) is a print formatter driven by XSL Formatting Objects [1] and an output independent formatter.
  • Apache News Online: 29 August 2007 – Apache OpenJPA 1.0.0 Released – The Apache OpenJPA community is pleased to announce the release of Apache OpenJPA version 1.0.0. Apache OpenJPA is a feature-rich implementation of the persistence part of Enterprise Java Beans 3.0, also known as the Java Persistence API (JPA)
  • 10 Candidates for Extreme Makeover, Ticker-Edition « GigaOM – Sun Microsystems is changing its ticker symbol from SUNW to JAVA in order to better reflect the company?s role in new network infrastructure. Here?s 10 companies that we think could use an extreme ticker makeover.
  • Google Web Toolkit Blog: GWT 1.4 release and out of beta – It’s a really big day for Google Web Toolkit: GWT 1.4 is now available — and, with more than a million downloads under our belt, GWT is no longer in beta!
  • InfoQ: Availability & Consistency – When we move to distributed architectures for scalability, fault-tolerance reasons we are also introducing additional complexities. Amazon CTO Werner Vogels dives into the different parameters that play in the tension between availability and consistency
  • InfoQ: Patrick Linskey discusses OpenJPA and the JPA specification – At The Spring Experience conference, InfoQ caught up with Patrick Linskey of BEA to discuss the current status of the Apache OpenJPA project. Linskey explains where OpenJPA came from, how it fits into the OR Mapping space, the features it provides
  • Ajax programming with Struts 2 – Java World – In this article, Oleg Mikheev shows you how to use Struts 2, Dojo and JSON to display data in an Ajax-style table. In the process, he introduces some Ajax-friendly features of Struts 2, including its integration with WebWork, Guice & the Dojo toolkit.
  • JLINQ: IBM’s new paradigm for writing Java database applications – The project code named Java Language Integrated Query (JLINQ) gives database application developers an easy, GUI-based means to significantly increase productivity in both the design and implementation phases
  • start – MUScoop Wiki – The primary purpose of this Wiki is to archive Marquette sports information and history. In time, this wiki will become the one-stop-shopping repository for records, player statistics and biographies and team results for all MU sports teams.

BEA Workshop Studio and Ubuntu

I have been following BEA’s acquisition of M7 to see what happens to the NitroX product. We are a big WebLogic shop and so I was curious to see what BEA is going to bake in the new release of NitroX renamed Workshop Studio. The new Workshop Suite is based on the Callisto (Eclipse 3.2 and WTP 1.5) release and is chalk-full of goodies including EJB 3.0 (JPA), Kodo, Spring, JSF (yuck), Struts, JSTL, Hibernate support among other specs/frameworks. Another cool thing in Workshop Studio is the ORM tool that is built-in that allows developers to access databases and build an object relational entity layer to model the data using persistence engine providers that implement the EJB3, JPA, Kodo and Hibernate. Workshop also supports Tomcat, Resin, Jetty, JBoss, and WebSphere in addition to WebLogic.

I am a die-hard IntelliJ IDEA fan and IDEA is still the BEST IDE in the market. IDEA has the best refactoring, smart-type auto completion, code analyzer capabilities and it is really the best IDE for writing code. However, it is missing many of the bells-n-whistles that Eclipse and now NetBeans have. In the last few months, I found myself looking at the NetBeans 5.5 betas and Eclipse 3.2 betas and wondering why IDEA was missing a lot of that functionality. Sun has really turned around NetBeans and the latest 5.5 betas have really rocked. The combination of the Profiler with NetBeans makes it a compelling offering and the price is right.

Guess I am getting off-topic here – So I’ve been playing with the latest release of Workshop Studio and my first impressions are very positive. I am hoping to use it exclusively for a month and then blog about my experiences. I recently upgraded my Linux box to Ubuntu (Dapper Drake) and I’ve been running more than SVN, MySQL, Apache, Tomcat and WebLogic on it. I try to install all of my development tools on my XP and Linux box for consistency and so I was able to install Workshop Studio on my Ubuntu Linux box without any problems. Out of the box, Workshop Studio doesn’t support Ubuntu but the installer does allow you to continue installation and use Workshop Studio. Here are the steps I used to install Workshop Studio:

I’m assuming you already have the 1.5 JDK installed on your box. If you don’t, you can use apt-get to get and install the latest SDK. This article at the Javalobby has a lot more details but here’s all I did for my installation:

sudo apt-get install sun-java5-jdk
sudo update-alternatives—config java
export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.5.0-sun-1.5.0.06/
sudo ./WorkshopInstaller.bin

The installer clears the launcher icons in the directory of your choice and you should be all set to use Workshop Studio. On his blog, Bill Roth discusses his experiences of installing Workshop on his Ubuntu box using JRockit. In addition to being a fellow Marquette alum and an all around great guy, Bill is also the vice president of the BEA Workshop Business Unit at BEA Systems. Bill asks the question in his blog entry about BEA officially support Ubuntu in their products and I would have to say a resounding yes to that. Most enterprises use RedHat on their servers but Ubuntu is fast catching up on the desktop side and so BEA should support RedHat and Ubuntu. Cannot wait for the day when I get type in apt-get jrockit, workshop and weblogic.