Daily del.icio.us for March 11th through March 14th

Daily del.icio.us for March 7th through March 11th

  • Coding Horror: Why Can’t Error Messages Be Fun? – Chrome is a joy to use, and in my opinion at least, it's the first true advance in web browser technology since the heady days of Internet Explorer 4.0. Chrome is filled with so many thoughtful details, so many reimaginings of web browser functionality as a true application platform, it's hard to even list them all.
  • Write your own Twitter application – JavaWorld – In this article you'll learn how to build your own Twitter service: an application that accesses tweets via the Twitter API and archives them in the form of a PDF file
  • Ooma rebounds after cutting price for service – After it stumbled out of the gate in July 2007, it's hard to imagine that Palo Alto's Ooma would look forward to an economic downturn. But the startup, which offers free home phone service with the purchase of an Ooma box, has found a new lease on life after cutting its price and expanding its distribution
  • JumpBox | Instant Infrastructure | JumpBox Inc. – We simplify server software deployment with pre-built, pre-configured software applications packaged for deployment on virtual computing platforms.
  • Top 50 New Software Development Books | Agile Zone – In this post I proudly present the Top 50 New Software Development Books, where new means "less than two years old". This list was created using a weighed mix of the following criteria:
  • X2O Blog // We Are Mammoth, Inc. – X2O is a web-based data modeling platform for Adobe® Flex® and Flash® apps.
  • MIT’s Introduction to Algorithms, Lectures 20 and 21: Parallel Algorithms – good coders code, great reuse – This is the thirteenth post in an article series about MIT’s lecture course “Introduction to Algorithms.” In this post I will review lectures twenty and twenty-one on parallel algorithms. These lectures cover the basics of multithreaded programming and multithreaded algorithms.
  • Why HTML – The short and sweet reason is simply this: XHTML offers no compelling advantage — to me — over HTML, but even if it did it would also offer increased complexity and uncertainty that make it unappealing to me.
  • Rough Type: Nicholas Carr’s Blog: The coming of the megacomputer – In a talk yesterday, reports the Financial Times' Richard Waters, the head of Microsoft Research, Rick Rashid, said that about 20 percent of all the server computers being sold in the world "are now being bought by a small handful of internet companies," including Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and Amazon
  • Coding Horror: HTML Validation: Does It Matter? – That said, validation does have its charms. There were a few things that the validation process exposed in our HTML markup that were clearly wrong — an orphaned tag here, and a few inconsistencies in the way we applied tags there. Mark Pilgrim makes the case for validation:

Daily del.icio.us for October 28th

  • Google is oddly silent about Grand Central | Between the Lines | ZDNet.com – Google is being very quiet about Grand Central, the virtual phone service it acquired in July 2007 but hasn’t really done anything with since. In my opinion, Grand Central is already a good service. There are a few features I’d like to see added but, for the most part, it’s working for me – so much so that, in a blog post a couple of weeks ago, I called it my favorite telecommuting tool.
  • How LinkedIn changed its security model in order to offer an API – This talk also covered how LinkedIn retrofitted the security model chosen for the API into the mainstream website, which helped tremendously in the scalability of the website by allowing stateless front-end / single sign-on (SSO), and improved security by removing sessions entirely.
  • Building LinkedIn’s Next Generation Architecture with OSGi – Over the course of the last 5 years, LinkedIn has been built using relatively simple technologies: front end web applications (Tomcat/Servlet/JSP), back-end services (Jetty/Spring Remoting), databases, replication, and JMS. Although the web site was scaling adequately, we had some big challenges to overcome: In this session, I talked about why OSGi was chosen to help us solve those challenges, the implementation progress we've made, the pitfalls that we've encountered (so far) and what we have learned in the process.
  • Atlassian Developer Blog – Performance testing with JMeter – This is the first in a series of blog posts aimed at documenting whats involved in setting up a performance test harness from scratch. In my next post, I will show how to deploy these performance tests using Maven 2 and how to automate the process using Bamboo
  • Almost Human: a review of Google’s Android G1 phone: Page 1 – The T-Mobile G1 Google smartphone, designed by Google and made by HTC, remains firmly in the shadow of the iPhone—for now. The phone, which goes on sale next week in the US and next month in Britain, was released too early. The HTC hardware and Android OS that powers it lack the polish and depth of even the iPhone 1.0 in most respects.
  • Charlie Owen – Windows Media Center in the PDC Build of Windows 7 – If you are attending the 2008 Professional Developers Conference you received a pre-beta Windows 7 build today (6801) which contains many features the Windows Media Center team has been developing over the past year
  • I would just like to say… – This post is for all of you out there who have developed or contributed to Linux/Ubuntu projects and all of the open source coders who read this
  • Windows 7: Windows 7 Walkthrough, Boot Video and Impressions – On Sunday, they took journalists through a lively 7-hour orientation on Win 7, then handed off a Dell XPS M1330 loaded with pre-beta Build 6801. Thankfully for the overworked, underappreciated developers at Redmond, it's surprisingly stable, and its look and feel already puts Vista to shame.
  • Microsoft Watch – Web Services & Browser – Office Goes to the Web – Microsoft made a stunning announcement during today's Professional Developers Conference: A lightweight Web-based version of Office. Office Web is a stunning concession to Google and other Web 2.0 platform developers offering Web-based productivity applications. Office Web will come with lightweight versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote.
  • Microsoft Joins Working Group for Open Standards Messaging Software: Decision to join AMQP Working Group based on commitment to openness, interoperability and providing customer choice. – Microsoft Corp. today announced that it is joining the Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) Working Group, an organization focused on the development of the AMQP specification. Microsoft is joining the AMQP Working Group at the request of its members, including several of Microsoft’s customers in the financial services industry, in order to support the development of an open industry standard for ubiquitous messaging.

Daily del.icio.us for April 4th through April 6th

  • Visual SourceSafe to Subversion Migration – This migration script will take all live files in a VSS project and migrate them to Subversion. Additionally, for those live files, all file history will be preserved. Without this, it wouldn't be a migration, merely an import.
  • VisualSVN Server – All-in-one installer for Subversion and Apache – VisualSVN Server is a package that contains everything you need to install, configure and manage Subversion server for your team on Windows platform. It includes Subversion, Apache and a management console.
  • Coding Horror: Setting up Subversion on Windows – When it comes to readily available, free source control, I don't think you can do better than Subversion at the moment. Allow me to illustrate how straightforward it is to get a small Subversion server and client going on Windows. It'll take all of 30 min
  • JRuby 1.1 is out! – The Empty Way – The long awaited JRuby 1.1 is finally out. Working on it was fun, much more fun than I expected — so much to do, so many interesting things, so little time! It is a perfect mixture of Java and Ruby
  • Executive Pay: The Bottom Line for Those at the Top – The New York Times – Compensation and accumulated wealth of 200 chief executives for large public companies that filed proxies for last year by March 28.
  • Build a quad-core, 8-gig server for $900 – Or maybe that's just what I tell myself when I only have $1,000 bucks to spend. Either way, multi-core CPUs made powerful computers far more affordable. You can build a fine quad-core, 8-gig server within that budget
  • My Essential Twitter Tools – If you’re using Twitter for personal, corporate use, or to manage the brand of a client, you’ll need the right tools to find and engage the discussions.

    Here are the tools that I’m using to improve my Twitter experience

  • Windows Vista source code – Windows Vista source code 🙂
  • Forbes.com – Dial D for Disruption – With Asterisk loaded onto a computer, a decent-size company can rip out its traditional phone switch, even some of its newfangled Internet telephone gear, and say good-bye to 80% of its telecom equipment costs. Not good news for Cisco, Nortel or Avaya.
  • dangertree techblog » Blog Archive » Groovy vs. Google Collections: Round #1 – In my last post, Dan Lewis responded with some counter-code from Google’s collections package. Instead of attempting to snap back with some witty technical retort, I challenged Dan to a code-off. Groovy collections vs. Google collections (in Java)
  • Adam Bien’s Weblog : Huge discussion about JavaDoc …and no one cares about Fat Clients 🙂 – I really wondered about the discussion about JavaDoc – but actually no one complained about this statement "Therefore, a fat client with a local embedded database, such as Java DB, is the simplest possible solution — everything else is a workaround.".
  • IntelliJ IDEA Blog » Blog Archive » Migrating to EJB 3 with IntelliJ IDEA is Easy – IntelliJ IDEA has the full-blown support for Enterprise Java Beans (EJB). Supporting EJB specs from 1.x to 3.0 and leveraging it through all of its productivity-boosting features, from coding assistance to refactoring, IntelliJ IDEA stands for the weapon
  • Gartner: Open source will quietly take over – ZDNet.co.uk – "By 2012, more than 90 percent of enterprises will use open source in direct or embedded forms," predicts a Gartner report, The State of Open Source 2008, which sees a "stealth" impact for the technology in embedded form:
  • Ext.ux.PrinterFriendly – Ext JS Forums – I'm happy to announce the first release of my (first) Ext JS extension – Ext.ux.PrinterFriendly which allows you to easily build printer friendly layouts and grids for your Ext JS pages.